Welcome to "Memorable Moments". Each week I will visually recap what I felt were the best and most memorable moments from that episode. The list may vary from week to week, depending on what has transpired in that particular episode.

Side note: With this article I'm doing something different this week. Some of the categories will have two entries one from the past(Bobby and Rufus) and from the present(Sam and Dean). I had to include the reunion of our Grumpy Old Men of Letters, Bobby and Rufus.

Welcome to "Memorable Moments". Each week I will visually recap what I felt were the best and most memorable moments from that episode. The list may vary from week to week, depending on what has transpired in that particular episode.

I get it, not every episode can be an epic winner, especially with a 23 episode season, but really? When the show has so much momentum right now we get this?  In the words of Sheriff Donna, “You betcha.”   

I shouldn’t be so harsh though, because “Plush” was not a total waste.  Sure, the script was.  It was a total disaster.  Penned by writers Eric Charmelo and Nicole Snyder, the script was littered with bad jokes, horrible dialogue, agonizingly slow pacing, and plenty of opportunities lost for anyone that loves the CSI classic, “Fur and Loathing.”   The things they could have done!  But yeah, instead we got a wimpy, mostly filler ghost tale about what happens when a grown man likes to dress in animal and clown costumes.  Bad things people.  Bad things.

Back in season four I wrote a cheeky full length recap for what is easily one of Jeremy Carver’s stinkers, “Family Remains.”  Out of the numerous things that I chastised, one was how little we saw Sam actually doing anything.  He said he was going to the attic, and then showed up later with a report.  I was so put out that we didn’t get that attic scene that I wrote it, right there in the review.  

What does that story have to do with “Thin Lizzie?”  Thank you new writer SPN Nancy Won, you finally gave me my Sam in the creepy attic scene.  It was marvelous.  So was your first episode. 
Symbolism can make a story's rich tapestry all the more fulfilling and illuminating. It can add layers and depth revealing fresh insights. It can come in dialog, in music, and in visual cues. “Form and Void” makes use of all of these to tell its story---but most of all it uses Catholic symbolism to convey so much.
The season eleven premiere, written by Jeremy Carver and directed by Robert Singer, opens with the traditional “The Road So Far” montage accompanied by Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Run Through the Jungle.”

The episode focuses on two story threads that the season ten finale left unloosed: the release of the Darkness and Castiel’s attempted murder of Crowley. The story breaks off into three separate narratives. We see Sam and Dean in the wake of the Darkness, Castiel huddled in a rural farmhouse, and Crowley’s escape.

The episode spends a majority of its time on Sam and Dean.